Search Results for: information forensics

Analyzing Fake Content on Twitter During Boston Marathon Bombings

As iRevolution readers already know, the application of Information Forensics to social media is one of my primary areas of interest. So I’m always on the lookout for new and related studies, such as this one (PDF), which was just published by … Continue reading

Automatically Identifying Fake Images Shared on Twitter During Disasters

Artificial Intelligence (AI) can be used to automatically predict the credibility of tweets generated during disasters. AI can also be used to automatically rank the credibility of tweets posted during major events. Aditi Gupta et al. applied these same information forensics techniques to automatically identify … Continue reading

Could CrowdOptic Be Used For Disaster Response?

Crowds—rather than sole individuals—are increasingly bearing witness to disasters large and small. Instagram users, for example, snapped 800,000 #Sandy pictures during the hurricane last year. One way to make sense of this vast volume and velocity of multimedia content—Big Data—during … Continue reading

Crowdsourcing Critical Thinking to Verify Social Media During Crises

My colleagues and I at QCRI and the Masdar Institute will be launching Verily in the near future. The project has already received quite a bit of media coverage—particularly after the Boston marathon bombings. So here’s an update. While major … Continue reading

Humanitarianism in the Network Age: Groundbreaking Study

My colleagues at the United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA) have just published a groundbreaking must-read study on Humanitarianism in the Network Age; an important and forward-thinking policy document on humanitarian technology and innovation. The report “imagines how … Continue reading

Automatically Ranking the Credibility of Tweets During Major Events

In their study, “Credibility Ranking of Tweets during High Impact Events,” authors Aditi Gupta and Ponnurangam Kumaraguru “analyzed the credibility of information in tweets corresponding to fourteen high impact news events of 2011 around the globe.” According to their analysis, “30% of … Continue reading

Predicting the Credibility of Disaster Tweets Automatically

“Predicting Information Credibility in Time-Sensitive Social Media” is one of this year’s most interesting and important studies on “information forensics”. The analysis, co-authored by my QCRI colleague ChaTo Castello, will be published in Internet Research and should be required reading for anyone interested … Continue reading

What Was Novel About Social Media Use During Hurricane Sandy?

We saw the usual spikes in Twitter activity and the typical (reactive) launch of crowdsourced crisis maps. We also saw map mashups combining user-generated content with scientific weather data. Facebook was once again used to inform our social networks: “We … Continue reading

Accelerating the Verification of Social Media Content

Journalists have already been developing a multitude of tactics to verify user-generated content shared on social media. As noted here, the BBC has a dedicated User-Generated Content (UGC) Hub that is tasked with verifying social media information. The UK Guardian, … Continue reading

Traditional vs. Crowdsourced Election Monitoring: Which Has More Impact?

Max Grömping makes a significant contribution to the theory and discourse of crowdsourced election monitoring in his excellent study: “Many Eyes of Any Kind? Comparing Traditional and Crowdsourced Monitoring and their Contribu-tion to Democracy” (PDF). This 25-page study is definitely a must-read … Continue reading